General Questions

How long has SET-BC been providing three tiers of service?

During the 2014-2015 school year, nine school districts piloted the three-tiered model. Following this successful pilot, the three-tiered service delivery model was implemented in all school districts across the province for the 2015-2016 school year.

What services are being offered in each of the three tiers?

Tier 1 Professional Development services are designed to help build the capacity of all district and school educators to use technology to support diverse learners in the classroom. Tier 2 training services are designed to train teachers and educational assistants on how to implement specific hardware and software with students in the classroom. Tier 2 classroom-based solutions are designed to provide consultation, training, implementation support and technology loans to classroom teachers interested in integrating technology into their classroom programs with all students including those with learning needs. Tier 3 training services are designed to help district specialists (e.g.SLPs, OTs, TVIs) develop their capacity to support students with complex needs who require individual technology solutions. Tier 3 student-based solutions are designed to provide consultation, training, implementation support and technology loans to school teams supporting students with very complex needs. Please see “SET-BC Services Tier1, Tier 2, and Tier 3″ for more specific information on the services in each tier.

What is the District’s Planning Committee role?

The role of the SET-BC District Planning Committee is to plan, prioritize and request SET-BC services in all three tiers for the coming school year. The District Planning Committee meets as necessary to plan Tier 1 Pro-D requests, Tier 2 and Tier 3 training requests and to screen and select Tier 2 classroom – and student-based requests. These requests are then discussed and submitted through the District Request for Service meeting held annually with a SET-BC service coordinator. The District Planning Committee members should be able to make administrative level decisions in Student Support Services, Learning Services, and Information Technology (IT) Services. Districts would also benefit from having the district’s Pro D chair(s), district specialists and the SET-BC District Partner as part of the District Planning Committee. Please see “SET-BC Services Overview, District Planning, and District Request for Service” for more information on the role of the District Planning Committee.

What is the SET-BC Provincial Review?

Once a district submits its District Request for Service, the SET-BC Provincial Resource Team (PRT) reviews the requests and approves the requests as something the program can support given its annual budget and staffing levels. This information is then returned to the District Planning Team and the next step, Collaborative Action Plans (CAPs) can proceed. Please see “SET-BC Services Overview” for more information on the SET-BC Provincial Review.

Status of SET-BC Loaned Equipment after the Service Year

What happened to the equipment and software that was on loan from SET-BC prior to September 2015 (i.e. from the previous one-tiered model)?

The SET-BC equipment and software that was on loan to school districts as of the end of the 2014-2015 school year was transferred to the school districts IF they wished to receive the transfer. Lists of equipment on loan was made available to districts with specific equipment identified as available for transfer, available for Equipment Only Status (EOS) or must be returned to the loan bank by end of June – District Planning Teams went over the list and determined if they wanted the “available for transfer” equipment transferred to the district. For any equipment being transferred, District Administration was required to sign off on the equipment acknowledging that SET-BC is no longer responsible for supporting it (the equipment becomes part of the District’s IT assets).

What is Equipment Only Status (EOS)?

EOS is a designation for equipment that SET-BC will continue to provide technical support for the remainder of the standard 5-year support window. Equipment that will be put on EOS will be those pieces of specialized equipment that districts typically do not have the capacity to support – like AAC devices, braille devices, physical access technologies and so on. Districts can, if they wish, request that equipment identified as EOS be transferred to the district but, once transferred, SET-BC no longer supports it in any way and the district will be left to deal with any repairs, replacement parts, etc. At the end of June of each school year, any equipment identified as EOS will continue to be supported by SET-BC for the remainder of the 5-year (from the date of equipment loan) window.

Do districts have to take on the transfer of SET-BC loaned equipment?

No – districts are under no obligation to receive transfer of any equipment identified as available for transfer. If the district does not want to have a piece of equipment transferred, it is simply returned to the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank for reuse. District Planning Teams would likely wish to discuss how the students who have been using SET-BC loaned equipment will be supported should that equipment be returned to the Loan Bank.

Can districts use transferred SET-BC equipment for any students?

Once equipment is transferred to the school district, it is up to the district to determine how best to utilize that equipment. The only stipulation is that, due to the original source of funding, it continue to be used to support students’ access to the curriculum. That means a transferred laptop cannot be used as staff equipment, for non-district programs, etc. And, at the end of life, it will be the district’s responsibility to dispose of the equipment according to Ministry of Education disposal guidelines.

What happens with specialized SET-BC equipment (Tier 3) that is currently on loan or that is EOS when a student graduates / leaves school at the end of Grade 12?

If the equipment is currently on loan during the Tier 3 service year (i.e. not on EOS), the equipment must be returned to the Provincial Loan Bank by the end of June so it can be reused with other students. If the equipment is on EOS, the Provincial Loan Bank will make a determination as to whether it is something that can be offered to the school district for transfer at the end of the year. This depends on the age of the equipment, whether or not it can be reused by other students in the province, whether or not it is required for repair parts, and so on.  If it is NOT available for transfer, the equipment must be returned to the Provincial Loan Bank by the end of June.

District Request for Service Questions

Preparing for the DRFS

Preparing for the DRFS

What do districts need to do to prepare for the District Request for Service meeting?

District Student Support Services administration should determine who will be on the SET-BC District Planning Committee. This committee (or working groups within the committee) should meet prior to the District Request for Service meeting to determine what requests the district will make for Tier 1 Pro D, Tier 2 Training, Tier 2 Classroom-based solutions, and Tier 3 Student-based solutions. Lists of requests should be prioritized to facilitate the SET-BC Provincial Review process. Please see “SET-BC Services Overview and District Request for Service” for more information.

When do the District Request for Service meetings happen?

Ideally these meetings are scheduled in the early spring for the upcoming school year.  This will allow districts to submit their annual District Requests for Services in time for the SET-BC Provincial Review process which happens starting the first week of May.  A Provincial Review meeting is scheduled once a week until the end of September.  If districts submit their DRFS by the end of May, there is a more likely chance that Tier 2 classroom-based solutions and Tier 3 student-based solutions can be shipped to districts in early September.  However, each district sets its own District Request for Service meeting date(s) with the final submission deadline being September 30th.  No District Requests for Service for that school year can be reviewed after that deadline date.  Please see “SET-BC Services – District Request for Service” for more information.

What if a district only knows some of its requests in May – can a partially completed DRFS be submitted?

Districts are under no obligation to submit requests in all three tiers for any given school year. Districts may choose to submit District Requests for Service with requests in only one or two tiers. However, only ONE District Request for Service can be submitted foreach school year. If a district anticipates having other requests before the final deadline of September 30th, the District Planning Team should wait and submit its one annual DRFS when completely ready. Please see “SET-BC Services District Request for Service” for more information.

How are services allocated in the three tiers?

Each year, districts will receive allocations for Tier 2 classroom-based and Tier 3 student-based solutions. These are based on several factors including but are not limited to average costs of technology loans and the annual SET-BC budget. SET-BC Tier 1 Pro-D, Tier 2 and Tier 3 training services are not allocated – the amount of service provided is limited by time and annual SET-BC staffing levels. This is why it is important to prioritize services on the DRFS so the Provincial Review can approve the top service priorities in each Tier. Please see “SET-BC Services Overview” for more information.

Can districts “swap” Tier 2 allocations for Tier 3 allocations or vice versa?

No – this is not supported. Districts must keep their requests for Tier 2 classroom-based solutions and Tier 3 student-based solutions within their annual calculated allocations for these tiers of service.

Can districts roll over Tier 2 and Tier 3 allocations to the next school year?

No – this is also not supported. SET-BC services will be provided on an annual basis. If a district does not have a Tier 2/Tier 3 request in one year, the district does not have to make a Tier 2/Tier 3 request for that school year.

If a district does not have Tier 2 or Tier 3 allocations for the coming year, can a District Request for Service be submitted with only Tier 1 Pro-D and Tier 2 Training requests?

Yes – small districts may not have Tier 2 classroom-based or Tier 3 student-based allocations each and every year. However, we recommend that all districts submit an annual DRFS identifying any of the services they could receive in that year including Tier 1 Pro-D and Tier 2 and Tier 3 Training services.

How should District Planning Teams screen and select for Tier 2 classroom-based and Tier 3 student-based solutions?

District Planning Committees can determine their own screening and selection process for Tier 2 classroom-based and Tier 3 student-based solutions. Districts may want to continue to screen for Tier 3 solutions using their established SET-BC screening process.Districts may choose to use the SET-BC Classroom-based Project Application template as a starting point for their own Tier 2 classroom-based solution screening/selection process. It is ultimately up to the District Planning Committee to determine the criteria and screening/selection process for allocated Tier 2 and Tier 3 services. Please see “SET-BC Services Overview and Templates/Forms” for more information.

Tier 1 Questions

What are Tier 1 Services?

Tier 1 Professional Learning Services

Can a district ‘book’ Tier 1 Pro D services for all NI Days on the District Request for Service?

While Tier 1 services are not allocated, there are limitations due to the number of SET-BC consultants available in the program. For example, the October Provincial Pro-D day may have 60+ districts requesting a Tier 1 Pro-D activity on that day and there are approximately 28 SET-BC consultants available so it is not possible to meet all those requests if they are submitted. This is why it is important for districts to prioritize their requests on the DRFS. If we have five districts all requesting a Tier 1 Pro-D activity on the October Pro-D on the topic of BYOD (Bring Your Own Device) we could schedule an online/virtual workshop that all five district staffs could attend. One of the important aspects of the SET-BC Provincial Review is to consolidate requests and find effective ways to support as many requests provincially as possible.

Will SET-BC pay for a district to bring in an outside speaker?

Possibly – this would go through our Provincial Review as a potential request that comes from several districts.  Depending on the speaker and topic, this would be reviewed under the assumption that the speaker/topic may be of interest to multiple districts so we could look at sponsoring a speaker for not just one district but for multiple districts through face-to-face, virtual and archived Tier 1 activities.  This has been supported in past years with speakers such as Shelley Moore, Carolyn Musselwhite, and Faye Brownlie.  If districts are interested in specific speakers, they should indicate this in the Tier 1 section of their District Request for Service.

Will SET-BC provide release time for teachers / EAs to attend Tier 1 Professional Learning activities?

No – this is not supported. SET-BC does not have funding to support district release time for attendance at Professional Learning or training events.

Will SET-BC provide travel and accommodation costs for district or school staff traveling to Tier 1 Professional Learning activities?

No – this would be a district expense.

How many Tier 1 activities and/or days of consultant time is each district allocated each school year?

Tier 1 Professional Learning activities are not allocated – the availability of consultants for delivery of Tier 1 services depends entirely on the reasonableness of the request, the size of the district, and the time our consultants have available during the school year. Again, it is important for districts to prioritize their requests on the District Request for Service.

Can a district request a Tier 1 Professional Learning activity during the school year (i.e. not identified on the DRFS but as an emerging need)?

Possibly – the priority for the SET-BC Provincial Review Team will be to support as many Tier 1 requests as identified on the DRFS as possible for all districts across the province. If a district has an emerging Tier 1 need during the school year, the District Planning Team could approach their SET-BC Service Coordinator with the request but it would need to go to the Provincial Team to determine if it could be supported given the existing service delivery schedule. Emerging requests would not be considered a priority and would be handled on an “as possible only” basis. If it is something that can be supported, the DRFS would be amended to reflect the additional service provision. District Partners should contact their SET-BC Service Coordinator to discuss possible DRFS amendments for emerging requests during the school year.

Can districts request any sort of Tier 1 Professional Learning activity the District Planning Committee feels meets the district’s needs?

Yes – districts can identify any Tier 1 Professional Learning request on the DRFS. However, the function of the SET-BC Provincial Review process is to determine if any specific request (in any of the tiers) is supportable given the SET-BC mandate, the level of expertise of the consultants, and the reasonableness of the request in terms of timeline. All these factors will be taken into account during the Provincial Review. The SET-BC Service Coordinator will also discuss the appropriateness of the request during the District Request for Service meeting and will help districts submit requests that have the highest potential for support.

Tier 2 Training Questions

How many Tier 2 training activities and/or days of consultant time is each district allocated each year?

Tier 2 training activities are not allocated – the availability of consultants for delivery of Tier 2 training services depends entirely on the reasonableness of the request, the size of the district, and the time our consultants have available during the school year. It is important for districts to prioritize their requests on the District Request for Service so the Provincial Review can identify those services most important to districts.

Can Tier 2 training activities include training on hardware or software not available through SET-BC?

Yes – districts can request Tier 2 training on hardware or software currently available in the district for students regardless of source. The goal of Tier 2 training service is to help teachers and EAs utilize technologies available in the district that are currently under utilized due to a lack of training.

What is the difference between Tier 1 Professional Learning and Tier 2 training services?

The difference between Tier 1 Professional Learning and Tier 2 training lies with the topic of the activity and possibly the audience.

Tier 1 Professional Learning is broad based and seeks to create a strong foundation for teachers and EAs on how technology in general can support diverse students in the classroom. Participants in Tier 1 Professional Learning may not have immediate access to the technologies highlighted but need an overview or sense of the options available to support educational initiatives such as UDL or Digital Citizenship.

Tier 2 training is very narrow and seeks to train teachers and EAs on how to use a specific piece of equipment or software. Participants in Tier 2 training should have immediate access to the technology (e.g. use it on Monday). Ideally, District Planning Committees will look at how Tier 1 Professional Learning builds a foundation for Tier 2 training activities (and Tier 2 classroom-based solutions) as part of an overall district plan for in-service and staff development.

Refer to the sections of this document on Tier 1 and Tier 2 services for examples of the type of training events or activities that have been supported in both tiers.

Tier 2 Classroom-based Solution Questions

What can I expect with Tier 2 classroom-based support?

What’s Next? Classroom Based Solutions

How can districts screen and select Tier 2 classrooms each year?

Each District Planning Team can determine its own criteria and screening/selection process for its annual Tier 2 classrooms. Districts may want to look at the SET-BC Classroom-based Project Application forms we used in previous years (available in “SET-BC Services Templates and Forms”) as a starting point for their own process.

Can a district resource room be prioritized to receive a Tier 2 classroom-based solution?

This is likely not supportable in the SET-BC service delivery model. The point of Tier 2 classroom-based solutions is to provide classroom teachers, in a classroom setting, with technology, training, and implementation support that will allow him/her to plan for the use of technology for all students in the room, including those that require technology to access the classroom-based curriculum. Tier 2 classroom-based solutions seek to support the primacy of the general classroom and to promote the intended goal of inclusion of all students in the classroom setting.

Can a district prioritize more than one classroom for a single Tier 2 classroom-based solution?

In the case of schools that platoon or for high schools, where students may be moving between teachers, the focus needs to remain on the classroom setting. However, it is possible that a pod of hardware and software moves from one room to another to support the same or other students access to the curriculum. For example, the technology pod could move with the same students to different curricular areas OR the technology pod stays with the same teacher who then uses it with other students during the day. It will be up to the district to identify what the plans for the solution are and to the classroom teacher(s) to be specific as to how the technology will be used during the CAP process. It is important for districts to understand that Tier 2 classroom based solutions are NOT intended to be student specific so the technology pods cannot be “broken up” during the Tier 2 service year to be used by students in different classes to meet their individual needs.

What does a typical Tier 2 classroom-based equipment loan look like?

This question usually arises when teams wonder if they can request a classroom “set” of laptops or iPads (i.e. one to one).  This level of support is not possible.  Typically a Tier 2 classroom loan is a bundle of computing devices (e.g. laptops and/or iPads) with software and/or iApps.  The final number of “units” that can be loaned to the district for use in a specific classroom, depends on a number of factors including how many additional pieces of equipment are requested, and the cost of district preferred laptops or Chromebooks.  The Tier 2 classroom-based solutions are provided in partnership with school districts and their IT departments.  During the District Request for Service meeting, the SET-BC Service Coordinator will determine exactly what types of technologies the district IT department is willing to support – this information will be brought forward to the classroom teacher during the Collaborative Action Plan (CAP) meeting.

Can districts request equipment or software not available in the SET-BC Loan Bank?

Possibly – Upon completion of the Tier 2 Classroom-based CAP meeting, the SET-BC consultant will submit a loan request containing the specific pieces of technology being requested for loan from SET-BC. The Provincial Resource Team (PRT) conducts a review of all loan requests and approve them on the basis of whether or not we can support the request. All reasonable effort will be made to support technologies being requested – however, we need to take into account whether or not our technical support staff can support the equipment for the Tier 2 service year and whether or not our consultants are able to train and support implementation of the hardware/software so some solutions may not be available from SET-BC.

Will SET-BC provide DEP ready iPads and/or district preferred laptops or Chromebooks?

Yes – During the District Request Process, the SET-BC Service Coordinator will discuss the exact types of technologies that the district requires or prefers in order to support them following the Tier 2 service year.  If the district team requires DEP ready iPads, SET-BC will purchase them as such specifically for that district.  If the district team prefers a specific model of a laptop or a Chromebook, SET-BC will make every attempt to purchase the model that is preferred.  Note that provision of district preferred computing units will mean that the district, NOT SET-BC, will be responsible for the repair and maintenance of the equipment even during the active Tier 2 service year.

Can districts put their own images on SET-BC loaned laptops?

Yes – this is something many districts have been doing for years.

What happens to the Tier 2 classroom-based technology after the Tier 2 service year?

At the end of the school year, any Tier 2 classroom-based technologies that have been provided by SET-BC are available to be transferred to the district.  This does not include DEP ready iPads or district preferred laptops/Chromebooks as they are already part of the district’s assets having been, technically, transferred as a result of the original district-specific request.  Once equipment has been transferred to the district, SET-BC is no longer responsible for its support.  If the district does not want it transferred, then the equipment will need to return it to the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank.

Districts are not under any obligation to receive transfer of any or all of the technology loaned for Tier 2 classroom-based solutions.  During the annual SET-BC Equipment Review process, the SET-BC District Partner will receive a complete listing of all equipment that is currently on loan so the district can determine which equipment the team members want transferred and which will be returned to the SET-BC Loan Bank.

Tier 3 Specialist Training Questions

How does Tier 3 training services differ from Tier 2 training services?

Tier 3 training services are designed to support district specialists and help them build their capacity to support the types of technologies that are used by their most complex needs students. Tier 3 training events or activities, then, would involve small group exploration of specific technologies (e.g. braille notetakers) with discussion on how to customize them and implement them with complex students. Tier 3 training events or activities are facilitated by Tier 3 consultants and focus on providing the information specialists will need to train and support their district staff (e.g. teachers and EAs) for effective ongoing implementation of the technologies.

How many Tier 3 training requests can a district team put forward each year on the District Request for Service?

As with Tier 1 Professional Learning and Tier 2 technology training requests, there are no allocations forTier 3 training requests. The number of requests that can be approved each year will depend on SET-BC’s annual funding and staffing levels. As with other training requests, district teams are asked to prioritize their Tier 3 training requests on the District Request for Service.

Can Tier 3 training services be used to continue to provide support for a school team working with a complex needs student who received Tier 3 service last year?

No – this type of individual team support would be categorized as Tier 3 student-based solution support (which is allocated) and would not be possible as a Tier 3 training request. Specialists attending group Tier 3 training events or activities can certainly bring forward student case studies for group discussion but the goal of the Tier 3 student-based solution year is to build as much team capacity as possible to carry on with student support in non-Tier 3 years. Tier 3 specialist training is not designed to focus on any one student but rather on the skills and knowledge specialists need to support a variety of students with complex needs and how specific technologies can support them.

Does SET-BC offer provincially coordinated Tier 3 level training during the school year?

Yes – SET-BC facilitates training opportunities that explore ‘genres’ of complex needs technologies (e.g. vision, AAC and physical access) as well as events featuring specific complex technologies (e.g. Braillesense U2). These are advertised through the DistrictPartner network as well as on SET-BC’s online Upcoming Events area of the website. These sessions are designed for district specialists and not as general overviews for other district educators.

Tier 3 Student-Based Solutions Questions

What can I expect with Tier 3 student-based support?

What’s Next? Student Based Solutions

What are the funding categories of students that SET-BC will support through Tier 3 services?

The three-tiered service delivery model is non-categorical. This means it is up to each district to determine its own criteria, screening and selection process for identifying the teams supporting students for whom it wants Tier 3 services for the year. The purpose of Tier 3 student-based solutions is to support those students in the district that have very complex needs and that the district would have difficulty supporting on their own (e.g.students with significant visual impairments, dependent non-verbal students, etc).

Can districts trial devices for students not yet identified as requiring Tier 3 services during that school year?

Yes – district staff can go through the SET-BC Provincial Resource Team to request devices for short term trials to determine which complex technologies would be appropriate for students. It is important to note, however, that these short term trials are possible only if the Loan Bank has the devices available. In the case of very expensive complex solutions, teams may be placed on a waiting list until one becomes available for trial.

Teams are definitely encouraged to request devices for trial in the spring before the Tier 3 service year as early determination of the appropriate technology solution ensures the longest possible time for Tier 3 consultant support (e.g. training, implementation, troubleshooting).

Are device trials part of the service provided in the Tier 3 service year?

Yes – SET-BC Tier 3 consultants will discuss the need for trial devices with the student’s team during the CAP process. This will happen for those complex devices where access is in question and if the district team has not completed trials the year before the Tier 3service year (see question above).

It is very important for district specialist teams to understand that the specialist is responsible for conducting the actual trial or assessment. The Tier 3 consultant can facilitate acquisition of the device(s) for trial and provide resources on how the technology works but the specialist involved with supporting the student must coordinate, plan, and monitor the trial to ensure it happens early and within the short term trial period (21 days). Requests for Tier 3 trials should not be made if a district specialist is not available to support the trial. SET-BC is not adequately staffed to provide the day-to-day support teams and students require during an assessment or trial.

Is there a deadline for determining the long term student-based solution during the Tier 3 service year?

Yes – Teams must decide which long term solution will be put in place no later than January 31st of the Tier 3 service year. This deadline is important for several reasons including the time it may take to acquire the specialized equipment (some vendors can take up to three months to ship equipment if the device is new, custom or not available) and the time needed for the Tier 3 consultant to provide the critical training and support to the team so the student can use the solution effectively. Past experience has proven that delay of this decision beyond the end of January creates a situation where any technology put in place after spring break has, for all practical purposes, a 2 month window for actual support (June being a complex year end month). Tier 3 consultants have difficulty, then, given their caseloads, finding blocks of time during those two months to provide the intense team support needed.

Does SET-BC provide technical support for Tier 3 equipment during the Tier 3 service year?

Yes – SET-BC will provide all technical support required for any technologies loaned during the Tier 3 service year.

What happens to the Tier 3 equipment at the end of the service year – what is EOS?

By default, all complex technologies on loan to a district for Tier 3 student-based solutions will be placed on EOS (Equipment Only Status); this means SET-BC will continue to provide technical support for repair and replacement parts for the remainder of the standard 5 year support window. EOS means that hardware that requires firmware updates, replacement of devices due to system failures (not loss or negligent damage), general repairs, and so on can be provided through the SET-BC Technical Support Team (TST). It is important to note, however, that EOS status does NOT include consultant support for training, implementation, accessory requests and so on.

At the end of the EOS period, IF the student still needs to use the equipment, the district can request that it be transferred to the district.  This transfer would be approved on the understanding that the specific student still requires it for his/her program.  Once it is transferred, like any transferred equipment, SET-BC no longer has the responsibility for its maintenance and repair.

What happens to equipment a Tier 3 supported student is using when they receive a new student-based solution from SET-BC?

If the equipment is still on EOS – it is still part of the SET-BC Loan Bank and must be returned to SET-BC immediately upon receipt of the new equipment.  The district is not able to keep the equipment to use with another student as it will need to be brought back into our Loan Bank for possible re-allocation or use in other areas of the province.

If the equipment is no longer on EOS (it has been transferred to the district because it is no longer on EOS), then it is up to the district team to determine what is to be done with it.  It may be used with another student or put into the district’s equipment loan bank for trials and assessments.  But it cannot be sold and must be disposed of appropriately if no longer functioning or useful.

What happens if a team requires SET-BC consultant support after the first year of Tier 3 services?

That team will have to be identified for Tier 3 service in the following year(s).

If a student is already using SET-BC loaned equipment, can they be put forward for Tier 3 service again?

Yes – each year the district team, through the District Request for Service, prioritizes those teams working with students who require Tier 3 service. Districts can bring forward students who have received Tier 3 services in the past or districts can identify students who have never received Tier 3 services. Some students, throughout the course of their K-12 education may come forward 3-4 times as they grow and their needs change. Others may come forward only once. The service delivery model allows districts to make its own determination as to what Tier 3 services it would like every year regardless of what has been provided in the past.

What happens to the equipment if a student is no longer using the SET-BC Tier 3 loaned equipment?

This depends on the status of the equipment.

If the equipment is being used by an actively supported Tier 3 student during the Tier 3 service year, the team should contact the SET-BC Tier 3 consultant to arrange for its return to the SET-BC Loan Bank.

If the equipment is still on EOS (regardless of the reason for the student not using it – graduating, no longer needs it), it must be returned to the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank.  The team member supporting the student should contact loanbank@setbc.org for instructions and assistance.

If the equipment has been transferred to the district, then it is up to the district team to determine what should be done with it – use it with another student, put it in the district loan bank, or retire it and dispose of it appropriately.

What happens if a complex needs student using currently loaned or EOS technology moves to another district?

If the technology solution is currently on loan (i.e. it is during the active Tier 3 service year), the entire equipment loan must be returned to the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank immediately.  The team member supporting the student should contact the SET-BC Tier 3 consultant for assistance in returning the equipment to SET-BC and the SET-BC Loan Bank will oversee transfer of the equipment to the student’s new school (if in British Columbia).

If the technology solution is on EOS, it is still part of the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank and the entire equipment loan must be returned to the SET-BC Provincial Loan Bank.  The team member supporting the student should contact loanbank@setbc.org for assistance in returning the equipment.  The SET-BC Loan Bank will oversee transfer of the equipment to the student’s new school (if in British Columbia).

If the student has been using specialized equipment that has originated with SET-BC but has been transferred to the school district, it is up to the district team how to proceed. However, we would encourage all school district teams to consider the importance of sending a specialized student solution along with the student to the receiving district as it is likely the student relies on the solution and it is likely the receiving district won’t have the resources to replicate the solution. In any given year, districts may send solutions on or may receive solutions so the support of the student involves the greater educational community.